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Alpine A110 1600S '72
Alpine A110 1600S '72
Appears in Gran Turismo 6
Gran Turismo Sport (Update)Update Icon
Interior in GT6 Detailed
Manufacturer Alpine
Displacement 1,565 cc
Drivetrain RR
Aspiration Natural
Engine Renault 16
Max Power 138 HP / 6,000 rpm
Performance Points 422 PP
Top Speed 130 miles per hour (210 km/h)
Length 151.6 inches (3,850 mm)
Width 59.8 inches (1,520 mm)
Height 44.5 inches (1,130 mm)
Weight 715 kilograms (1,580 lb)
Power/Weight Ratio 5.18 kg (11.4 lb) per horsepower

For the simpler version of this car, see Alpine A110 1600S '73.

The Alpine A110 1600S '72 is a coupe produced by Alpine. It appears in Gran Turismo 6 and Gran Turismo Sport, where it was added as part of Update 1.13, released on February 28, 2018.

Colors Edit

The player is stuck with only one color upon buying this car:

  • Bleu Alpine

DescriptionEdit

"The icon of Alpine, the pinnacle of ultra-lightweight, rear-engined sportscar."

When it came to high-performance lightweight vehicles, the A110, created by French car maker Alpine, had few equals. The svelte coupe, that was introduced in 956cc form at the Paris Salon in 1962 produced in a total of 14 different variants to 1977, featured a rear-engine/rear drive layout (RR) that translated to amazing cornering prowess and incredible traction.

In 1963, the A110 was powered by a 1.1-liter engine, and for the next few years, displacement was incrementally increased. Then in 1969, the 1600S was introduced, equipped with a 1565cc powerplant that was used in the Renault 12 Gordini. In 1973, this engine was swapped out for the 1605cc unit from the Renault 17 Gordini. During its time, the car's suspension was upgraded and in 1974, the swing axle rear suspension of the nominal 1600cc cars was converted to the double wishbone rear suspension from the A310; the 1300cc cars retained the rear swing-axle layout.

There were three main variations to the 1600S, two with swing-axle rear suspension and the third with the double wishbone rear suspension that appeared in two variants. One, the 1600SC with two Weber 45DCOE carburettors like its predecessors intended for the French domestic market, and the 1600SI with fuel injection for export. The output of all three variants was 138 BHP @ 6,000 rpm and all had a 5-speed manual transaxle. The top speed for the cars was 130 mph, quite impressive for a car with only a nominal 1.6-liter engine. The secret was its overall light weight, it tipped the scales at around 700 kg (1,500 lb) and had excellent aerodynamics. The final variant of the 1600cc A110, the 1600SX, was produced during 1976 and 1977. Its specification had been heavily influenced by regulations concerning emissions and by the recent fuel crisis. Though it lacked the performance of its forebears the "1600 SX" was generally quieter and less demanding to drive. It was was fitted with the 1647cc engine from the Renault 16TX that produced 93 BHP @ 6,000 rpm and the 1600SX was also considerably heavier at around 800 kg (1,800 lb) than all the other nominal 1600cc cars and had a modest top speed of 118 mph.

Speaking of motorsports, the A110 was a successful rally car, and Alpine had enjoyed considerable rallying success with variants of the A110, winning numerous events since 1963 and were second in the 1969 European Rally Championship for Makes. With variants of the A110 1600S Alpine won the European Rally Championship for Makes in 1971 and were the winners of the inaugural World Rally Championship in 1973.

A total of 7,176 of all 14 variants of the A110 were produced in France between 1962 and 1977 the majority, 2,890, were the 1300cc Version 85. It is thought that approximately 1,300 of the total were 1600S variants and 389 1600SX were also produced.

AcquisitionEdit

GT6Edit

The Alpine A110 1600S '72 can be purchased from the dealership for 100,000 Credits. It has a detailed interior. A special 15th Anniversary version of the car is also available by pre-ordering the game via the Gran Turismo official website.

GT SportEdit

This car can be purchased in the Alpine section of Brand Central for 100,000 Credits.

PicturesEdit

NotesEdit

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